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How to write a CV

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How to write a CV

Although there?s no one-size-fits-all solution for the perfect CV, it should always be clearly formatted and short enough for a recruiter to scan quickly ? and most importantly ? tailored to the role you?re applying for.

Not sure where to start? Here are some basic rules on how to write a CV:

What information should I include on my CV?

CVs should never be completely formulaic, but there are a few things they should always contain:

1. Personal details:

It may sound obvious, but you?d be surprised how many people forget to include their name, email, contact phone number and address. To avoid any awkward moments, make sure these are clearly presented at the top of your CV. ?Curriculum Vitae? is an unnecessary title ? your name is not.

2. Personal statement

As it?s the first thing that?s shown on your CV, a personal statement is an essential part of standing out from the crowd. It explains who you are, what you?re offering, and what you?re looking for. Aim to prove why you?re suitable in one short and succinct paragraph.

3. Work experience:

This section should include all of your relevant work experience, listed with the most recent first. Include your job title, the name of the organisation, time in post, and your key responsibilities.

4. Achievements:

This is your chance to show how your previous experience has given you the skills needed to make you a suitable candidate. List all of your relevant skills and achievements (backing them up with examples), and make it clear how you would apply these to the new role.

5. Education:

Your educational experience and achievements should be listed here, along with dates, the type of qualification and/or the grade you achieved ? although the specific parts of education that you include in your CV will depend on your individual situation. For example, if you have more educational achievements than work experience, placing an emphasis on this section is a good idea.

6. Hobbies and interests:

You don?t always need to include hobbies and interests in your CV, but mentioning relevant ones could back up your skills and help you to stand out from the crowd ? not to mention give you something to talk about at an interview. Just don?t say you enjoy socialising with friends just for the sake of including something. If it?s not going to add value, leave it out.

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